Welfare Fraud: Is It Accidental or On Purpose?

Many believe that welfare fraud is done on purpose because it is so easy to commit. After doing extensive research on this topic and talking to a single mother who is currently on welfare, I found that welfare fraud is not done on purpose but it is also not done by accident.

The statement made by the single mother is a fascinating statement because she construes everyone’s thoughts on that welfare fraud is either done on purpose or it is done by accident but she states that there is a grey area where it could be both. A state’s that “any excess cash or income you make you don’t want to report because it comes off your check and then your kids can’t eat next month” which causes the parent who is on welfare to have a tough decision, commit a crime or let their child/children to be hungry. In Mosher’s analysis of welfare fraud, she states that the punishment given towards those in violation of the rules and regulations of welfare are exactly what is needed and is the so called “iron fist” of the governing state. Mosher’s analysis is similar to the respondent’s remarks in that they both agree that the “iron fist” is a governing tool to keep those on welfare from committing welfare fraud. A states that “the government has given the welfare agencies the ability and encouraged them to make ‘monsters’ of the people relying on welfare benefits” which is similar to Mosher’s “iron fist”.

The role of welfare fraud in neoliberal societies is mostly represented through the ideas of the middle and upper class. In neoliberal societies, people rely on harsh measures taken in order to make the middle-class values stand out among the others. This results in the welfare fraud being designed to make those who are less than middle-class to either abide by the rules or not receive handouts from the government. In neoliberal societies, welfare fraud is based too much on the views and values of the lawmakers rather than those who have to abide by the law therefore causing some of the laws to be broken in order for those on welfare to provide for their families and themselves.

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One response to “Welfare Fraud: Is It Accidental or On Purpose?

  1. You write that “ In Mosher’s analysis of welfare fraud, she states that the punishment given towards those in violation of the rules and regulations of welfare are exactly what is needed and is the so called “iron fist” of the governing state”.

    Mosher is not endorsing punitive neoliberal welfare policies, nor is she a supporter of the ‘iron fist’ of the state. Writing from a critical legal studies tradition that is informed by an understanding of the role of law in the perpetuation of class-based hierarchies, Mosher describes the way that welfare law constructs single mothers (and others) as ‘presumed criminals’ to be monitored, judged, and punished. This exacerbates already-existing forms of marginalization. It is important to note that Mosher is describing and analyzing these practices – but not endorsing them.