Food for Thought: Critical Intersections of Law, Race, Gender, and Class

This class is dedicated to the critical legal studies (CLS) movement, a diverse collection of approaches to questions of law and society that emerged from 1960s counterculture and a growing sensitivity to the intersection of law and forms of discrimination associated with race, class, and gender. Scholars from this tradition are concerned with the role of law and ideology in upholding and reproducing systems that institutionalize inequalities and discrimination. Case studies for this class will include the case of R. v. Kahpeaysewat [2006] and Douglas Hay’s analysis of the English ‘Bloody Code’. 

Food for thought:

Sociological Images has an interesting post on the NYPD ‘stop-and-frisk’ policy. The post includes a link to the video ‘Hunted and Hated’. For this week’s food for thought exercise, I would like you to read the SocImages post, view the video, and then respond to this question:

How can we draw on the ideas of the Critical Legal Studies, feminist jurisprudence, and / or critical race theory movements to explain the NYPD stop-and-frisk program?

This post is due Sunday, November 4.

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